Dialogue on Counter Narrative to ISIS Propaganda

20th Nov 2015
OverviewLead DiscussantsProgramme Agenda

In the context of present international security scenario, the terror group IS (Islamic State) has been able to grow rapidly in its military momentum despite the military intervention by US and its allies in the Persian Gulf. Apart from these military gains, the group bears an immense strength in terms of its emotional appeal and has successfully managed to indoctrinate vulnerable and impressionable youths across the world to join their ranks in Syria, Iraq and now Libya, in their pursuit of a misinterpreted notion of Jihad. The IS has been able to garner support across the world through a very tactical and strategic exploitation of the social media space. According to a recent report by Quilliam Foundation, the almost ubiquitous presence of the terrorist outfit in the virtual space coupled with the sheer volume of the unique propaganda that is developed on a daily basis makes the very effort of building a counter narrative becomes redundant. The different propaganda techniques adopted by ISIS also ends up painting a picture of Jihad, wherein joining the group is not only restricted to the idea of indulging in a war but also becoming a member of the “Caliphate” to serve for “God’s project on Earth.” The Foundation’s report also observes that the use of brutality by the ISIS is a red herring and only serves to muzzle local dissent and gratify sympathizers on an international level whilst colouring a comprehensive understanding of its organizational and recruitment structure. Thus while the West is preoccupied by labelling the narrative of the outfit under the head of brutality, the most important narrative for ISIS’ propagandists that fuels its growth is the offering of an Islamic utopia. To this extent, failure to assess the ISIS theory of utopia will preclude any efforts to challenge the ideas of the outfit successfully.

Evidently, the social media has emerged as the ‘radical mosque’. Charlie Winters from the Quilliam Foundation has observed that “While radicalization, for the most part begins offline, Islamic State, along with other groups, has nurtured a situation in which the curious are able to have direct contact with former or current fighters, hear first-hand accounts from the battlefield and swap logistical advice. In decades gone by, this was a function served by so-called ‘radical mosques’. In the digital era, social media platforms are the space where this happens. Crucially, social media platforms are not the reason for radicalization or recruitment, just as ‘radical’ mosques and bookshops were never the reason.” Thus, it is evident that it is not simply the propaganda that is fuelling ISIS recruitment. It is a combination of external human influence and systematic radicalization process that has sustained the radicalization.

In the context of India, the national security agencies have already undertaken a number of measures that include individual counseling for detained potential recruits with participation of the family members of the detainee and patronizing of Islamic scholars from various sects and community based organizations to address their communities. Referring to a meeting note uploaded by Department of Homeland Security of US Federal Government on its public website, even though the current approach of Government of India may count as an ethical counter-narrative but several possible approaches of counter-narrative yet remains to be utilized by the government. In the current scenario, when ISIS is driven by an objective to build a radical anti-thesis to the contemporary global political and economic order, the need for India to build a counter-narrative is immediate when its own citizens today are attracted by the macabre theater of extremist narrative espoused by the ISIS. However to really develop an effective counter narrative, it is imperative to break down the ISIS propaganda techniques into its constituent parts for a more nuance understanding of its information war. In doing so, we will further inform the development of an alternative narrative that thwarts its growth.

The Oval Observer Foundation in collaboration with the Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies (IPCS), will convene a roundtable dialogue on 8th December 2015 with members from the Government of India, strategic community and the diplomatic community to discuss how India can develop counter-terrorism policies that not only guard her domestic front from ISIS radicalism but also support the efforts of the international community through development of effective counter-narratives both on social media and through de-radicalization programs in conjunction with intelligence sharing. The report prepared by the Quilliam Foundation will serve as a background for understanding the reach of ISIS propaganda and will be used to steer the discussion in a direction that is solution oriented.

The Key Themes of the Dialogue will include:
• Identifying the element of external human influence in the radicalization process and evaluating policy responses for the same.
• Developing a dedicated digital media center based on a public-private partnership model to monitor the communication channels and to use modern digital technology to build the alternative narrative.
• Sources of Financing for Outreach and Operational Activities of ISIS and What India can do to control the same.
• Identifying the baseline of ISIS extremist narrative.

Coming Soon
Coming Soon

Oval – OMFIF: Financing Infrastructure Projects in Africa

10th Aug 2015
OverviewProgramme AgendaPanelists

As the African continent becomes a more integrated economic area and a progressively more important force in the global economic system, the Oval Observer Foundation (OOF) in collaboration with Brown Rudnick LLP and Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF), is conducting a Half Day Session on Financing Infrastructure Projects in Africa. The session will capitalize upon and satisfy the growing international interest in the continent’s infrastructural potential by bringing together public and private sector bodies to examine issues related to public and private investment in this sector.

Vast majority of the infrastructure projects in Africa are dependent on funding from Government, Aid or Development Finance sources. Whilst this practice is perfectly acceptable, it limits the capacity of any country to narrow the demand-supply gap. Africa is on a growth path and with increasing urbanization it will need access to energy, transport, water, waste-management, roads and other utility services. Some of these sectors such as roads, ports, will require strong Government participation but there are other sectors such as energy, drinking water and waste management where countries can attract significant private sector capital. So how can Global Financing Communities, public and private collaborate to develop a robust framework to accelerate infrastructure financing for Africa?

Oval Observer Foundation in collaboration with Brown Rudnick LLP and OMFIF is delighted to organize two panel sessions focused on infrastructure development in Africa as part of the OMFIF African Public Investors Meeting 2015.

9:00-9:10hrs Welcome Address
Sanmit Ahuja, Vice-Chairman, Oval Observer Foundation
9:10-10:40hrs Panel 1: Enabling and Accelerating BOOT model to create a Private Sector Infrastructure Finance Market
10:40-11:00 hrs Open Q&A
11:00-12:25hrs Panel 2:Supporting growth of Decentralized Infrastructure
12:25-12:40hrs Open Q&A
12:40-12:45hrs Closing Remarks
  • Brian Sturgess, Editor-in-Chief, World Economics
  • John Davie, Chairman, Altra Capital
  • Clive Sheldon, Managing Partner, Argentis Capital
  • SanmitAhuja, Vice-Chairman, Oval Observer Foundation
  • Henry Kikoyo, Partner, Brown Rudnick LLP

India’s Foreign Policy Engagement with West Asia

15th Jun 2015
OverviewLead DiscussantsEvent Reports

The political scenario in West Asia has undergone a significant transformation in the years following the ‘Arab Spring.’ Regimes have been toppled by both foreign intervention as well as popular protests and the region has descended into a hotbed of sectarian tension manifested through armed insurgencies and civil wars. While the major powers of the world attempt to grapple with an increasingly complex and difficult geopolitical situation, India’s reaction to recent turmoil has been marked by an absolute reticence to engage with the region. Choosing to err on the side of caution, India has avoided taking pro-active measures to respond to the crises in Syria, Iraq, Iran or Yemen; being content to just evacuate its citizens during an emergency. However, given the high stakes that India has in the region – ranging from energy security and trade to remittances from its widespread diaspora, several scholars have been baffled by India’s determination to sit on the sidelines rather than exert its influence to gain a stronger foothold in the region and help shape its future.

OOF is delighted to announce the launch of its project “Look West: India’s Leadership Role in West Asia” – a six month project through which the Foundation will attempt to stimulate a national conversation on the subject and explore the potential for India to intensify its engagement with the region. The 1st Roundtable is designed to function as a precursor to targeted discussions and conferences on concrete steps and actions that the Government can/should take to tackle specific crises – such as ISIS, the sectarian divide, Israel-Palestine conflict, etc. The objective of the 1st Roundtable will thus be to:

  • Canvass and document the wide spectrum of opinion that exists among the Indian strategic affairs community on India’s role in West Asia
  • Stimulate an in-depth discussion among academic experts and practitioners on the need for a more assertive role for India in West Asia.

Specific subjects that the discussion will be geared towards are:

  • The evolution of Indian foreign policy towards West Asia
  • Factors and drivers guiding India’s lack of engagement with West Asia in recent decades
  • India’s geostrategic, geopolitical, and economic interests in the region
  • The pros and cons of India taking a more proactive stance in the region and adopting a leadership role in responding to crises
  • P R KUMARASWAMY :: Faculty Member, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University
  • Dr. ISHRAT AZIZ (AMB) :: Former Indian Ambassador to Saudi Arabia, UAE and Tunisia
  • ANIL WADHWA :: Secretary (East), Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India

Workshop on Law & Policy for the Restoration of Ganga

05th Jun 2015
OverviewLead DiscussantsProgramme AgendaGallery

Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (IITK) and the Oval Observer Foundation in collaboration with PLR Chambers and Luthra & Luthra Law Offices are hosting an interactive session to present and discuss the legal and policy approaches that may be adopted to address the rejuvenation and restoration of River Ganga.

BACKGROUND TO IITC+

IITC+ (IITC plus) is a multi-stakeholder group operating under the banner of IITC (Consortium of 7 Indian Institutes of Technology – IITs) that has prepared the Ganga River Basin Management Plan (GRBMP). The IITC, led by IIT Kanpur, formed a group to seek best in class inputs from a wide range of Indian and international subject matter experts. With contributions from international experts and bodies, IITC+ has also created an extension in January 2015 known as “IITC+ International”. Working groups have been constituted to provide feedback on the plan already developed as well as to provide inputs for amendments and/or bridging gaps. The Oval Observer Foundation, Luthra & Luthra Law Offices and PLR Chambers are members of IITC+.

LAW & POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS IN THE GANGA RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN

IIT-C received a mandate from the Government of India in 2010 to develop an action plan for the restoration of the Ganga River Basin. In furtherance of the same, the Consortia has developed the basic framework for the institution that must be created to address multifarious issues involved in the cleaning of Ganga.

The IIT Consortia has developed a structure for the institution in the form of a Bill titled, The National River Ganga Basin Management Bill, 2013 (Bill). The Bill proposes the establishment of National River Ganga Basin Management Commission (Commission) and National River Ganga Basin Tribunal for the effective and expeditious disposal of matters affecting the River Basin with the objective of restoring the health of the Ganga River Basin.

The Commission envisaged in the Bill will be tasked with the responsibility of maintaining the health of the Ganga River Basin through various policy approaches. To this extent, it has been suggested that the Commission will comprise of the following departments for the efficient discharge of its duties.

  •  Information and Communication Wing
  •  Environmental Monitoring and Impact Assessment Wing
  •  Investigation Wing
  •  Research and Development Wing
  •  Policy, Planning and Advocacy Wing

In addition to the aforementioned departments, the Commission has also been empowered to form regional and specialized units under each of the wings as may be necessary from time to time. Broadly, the Commission’s duties and responsibilities include:

  •  Formulating strategies, plans, and programs for executing the objectives laid down in the Act.
  •  Strengthening Centre-State Coordination for conservation and development of the Ganga River Basin
  •  Manage and monitor the work of separate wings formed under the Commission
  •  Initiate investigations on alleged contraventions of the provisions laid down in the Act and issue orders and directions as it may deem fit.

To ensure a speedy disposition of appeals against the orders issued by the Commission, the Bill also envisages establishment of tribunal, The National River Ganga Basin Tribunal (Tribunal). The Tribunal will be presided by a Chairperson, who shall be an acting or retired judge of the Supreme Court of India along with another judicial member and subject matters experts in the field of law, public affairs, environmental matters and science and technology.

The aforementioned structure has been prescribed and designed specifically to address the mission goals identified by IIT-C+ in its report. In this regard, the broad objectives to be executed by the Commission through policy and legal interventions are as follows:

  • “Aviral Dhara”- Continuous flow in time and space including maintenance of connectivity of flow in the river systems.
  • “Nirmal Dhara”- Un-polluted flow so that the quality of river waters isn’t affected significantly by human activities.
  • Conservation and restoration of the river basin recognizing that the river is a geological entity and is essential for maintaining the ecological balance between various species that exist and rely on the basin in order to ensure that the damage caused to basin is not irreversible and irreplaceable.

The workshop is structured so as to address two critical areas:

  •  Assessing the Efficacy of the Legislative Framework prepared by IIT-C+
  •  Evaluating the Robustness of Policy Interventions envisaged in the Bill.

Dr. Vinod Tare, Professor, IIT Kanpur

Dr Vinod Tare is a Professor of Environmental Engineering and Management at the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur and holds Sir M Visvesveriah Chair Professor instituted by the Ministry of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation. He is a Civil Engineer, obtained his Master’s and Doctoral degrees in Environmental Engineering from IIT Kanpur, and subsequently did post doctoral research at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. Dr Tare has guided numerous masters’ and doctoral dissertations. He was the Chairman of the India Water Impact Summit 2013 held at the India Habitat Centre, New Delhi and International Conference on Water – Harvesting, Storage and Conservation (WHSC-2009). Dr Tare is consultant/advisor to many government organizations, NGOs, Industries, and Institutions. He has developed environment-friendly passenger coach toilet system being deployed for Indian Railways, communities, house boats, KumbhMela, etc. Dr Tare is presently leading consortia of seven IITs for the preparation of Ganga River Basin Management Plan, which has been submitted to the National Ganga River Basin Authority chaired by the Prime Minister.

Dr. Indrajit Dube, Professor, IIT-Kharagpur

Dr. Dube is presently working as Associate Professor in the Rajiv Gandhi School of
Intellectual Property Law, IIT Kharagpur. Corporate Laws and Environmental Governance are the areas of specialization of Dr. Indrajit Dube. He has number of books, numerous articles and conference papers to his credit. Dr. Dube has to his credit research projects funded by different Ministries of Government of India, World Bank and other international agencies. Dr. Dube is also an academic member of the European Corporate Governance Institute.  He has been serving as the PrincipalInvestigator for the Policy, Law & Governance aspect of the Ganga River Basin Management Plan.

1330 hrs Registrations
1400 hrs Welcome Address
IIT-Kanpur, Oval Observer Foundation
1410 hrs The Mission Goals for Restoring the Wholesomeness of the Ganga River Basin
Dr. Vinod Tare, IIT-Kanpur
Coordinator, Consortium of 7 IITs on Ganga River Basin Management Plan
1450 hrs The Legislative and Policy Framework for Restoration of the Ganga River Basin
Dr. Indrajit Dube, IIT-Kharagpur
Legal Expert, Consortium of 7 IITs on Ganga River Basin Management Plan and Author of the National River Ganga Basin Management Bill, 2013
1600 hrs Open Q&A
Moderated by Sanmit Ahuja, Vice Chairman, Oval Observer Foundation
1700 hrs Release of National River Ganga Basin Management Bill
- Vinod Tare, IIT-Kanpur
- Indrajit Dube, IIT-Kharagpur
- Sanmit Ahuja, Oval Observer Foundation
1710 hrs High-Tea & Networking Reception

Oval Dialogue on Best Practices Against Money Laundering

18th Mar 2015
OverviewLead DiscussantsProgramme Agenda

Money laundering has emerged as an extremely complex legal and investigative challenge for the law enforcement agencies across the globe in recent times. Given the emergence of organized crime syndicates and terrorist outfits, the need to tackle the proceeds and funding routes of such activities has never been as pronounced as it is today.  The processes involved in laundering of ill gotten proceeds appear to be innocuous, however the culmination of these processes creates a web of transactions, which assist in putting a veil on the illicit activities that have generated these revenues and the illicit activities that receive financial support through such mechanisms.

Perhaps the major obstacle in conducting any money laundering activity successfully is the existence of financial havens and banking secrecy norms, which shield such activities from any investigative and evidentiary risks.  The issue is further amplified by the fact that with the advent of Internet, a number of virtual banks have sprung up creating a regulatory and jurisdictional nightmare for any enforcement authority.  A glaring example of the complexity of this issue is evidenced by operation of the European Union Bank. The European Union Bank was founded by two Russians with the objective of harbouring the illicit proceeds of the Russian organized crime syndicate.  The bank operated in the virtual space and claimed to offer its clients the strictest standards in banking secrecy and financial rewards related to offshore banking.  The nefariousness of its operation was revealed by the fact that it operated under a license from the Government of Antigua but had its computer server in Washington DC and the person operating both the server and the bank was in Canada.  Moreover Antiguan Law did not criminalize the theft of bank’s asset. Thus, as observed by Michael Levi et al., questions relating to; where was the crime committed? Who committed the crime? Who is going to investigate it and whether the accused can be arrested? –Fall within the grey area of law and policy and prima facie appear to be non-navigable. Nevertheless, investigative agencies with the support of the legal and regulatory ecosystem have had some measure of success in recovering and seizing such assets.  It is believed that law enforcement initiatives are able to recover $ 100-500 million in a good year. However, when this is juxtaposed with the money laundered by the international drug trafficking syndicate, which is to the tune of a staggering minimum of  $ 200 billion a year, it reflects the depth of the gaping hole in our international legal and regulatory framework.  It may be readily argued that our investigative intelligence may not be sufficient in addressing the issue and that there is aburgeoning need for greater synergy between varied disciplines such as data science, law, criminology and finance.

Oval Observer Foundation is delighted to convene a Dialogue on Best Practices Against Money Laundering. The Dialogue will serve as a platform for money laundering experts from the finance, legal and law enforcement sectors to share ideas and stories with the objective of evaluating howinvestigations and asset recovery mechanisms can be consolidated to tackle the scourge of money laundering and assist in recovering proceeds of illicit/corrupt activities.

Key Topics of the Dialogue will include:

  • Money Laundering & Financing of Terrorism
  • International legal and regulatory response to combat money laundering/proceeds of corruption
  • Bank secrecy norms & investigative obstacles
  • Can Big Data help in tracking proceeds of illicit activities?
  • Ethical banking practices, which may prevent laundering of ill-gotten money.

 

Coming Soon
Coming Soon

Economic & Financial Instruments for Restoring Ganga

18th Mar 2015
OverviewLead DiscussantsProgramme AgendaGallery

India has emerged as the fourth largest economy in the world in terms of purchasing power parity on account of the post liberalization developments and advent of the information technology industry. Despite witnessing a decline in poverty and a rise in spending, a sizeable proportion of the populace lacks access to basic resources required for a healthy livelihood. Among these, water availability in general and access to safe water in particular have emerged as a key focus area in the policymaking arena given the pronounced problems that plagues the Indian populace. The surge in population has only added insult to injury with a significant and consistent reduction in per capita availability of water, which may eventually result in India becoming a water-stressed country.

Needless to say, that these issues can’t be tackled by the public sector alone, given their financial limitations, and the private sector needs to get involved actively in developing regulatory reforms and financial models which are mutually beneficial. As per the recent budget there is going to be a thrust on coverage of rural population with piped water supply schemes, planning for optimum use of sustainability component in water stressed blocks and using incentive funds to decentralize management of water supply schemes. However, there has been a significant cut in the budget allocation. This puts the onus on the private sector to fill the void through sustainability projects on a PPP model targeted at access to drinking water in rural regions in India. The water scenario is not restricted to issues of sanitation and supply but extends to maintenance of river health in the interest of sustainability. In this regard, for example, the government has provided 2100 crore for rejuvenation of the Ganga River Basin. However, estimates reveal that any effort to clean the Ganga will require international expertise coupled with utilization of advanced technologies and industry incentivisation. The IIT-C+ report estimates that the annual expenditure on sanitation, solid waste and water for the river basin will be to the tune of 2,00,000 crores and the whole process would require an investment of 6,00,000 crores. The problem of funding is further compounded by the fact that there is no identifiable water market that exists in India currently and lack of take-out financing for the water sector. Thus while there is a need for private sector involvement in India’s water market, there is also an onus on the policymakers to introduce reforms and instruments, which incentivize the industry in developing sustainable growth models.

Oval Observer Foundation is delighted to organize a workshop on Economic and Financial Instruments for Restoration of Ganga.

The GRBMP suggests that Government of India must move towards a Public-Private-Partnership (PPP) structure in some of components in water/waste sector since it offers immense opportunities for growth given the high level of waste generation and water pollution levels in Indian rivers. This requires huge investments to the tune of an estimated INR 600,000 crores (US$ 100 b) with high revenue generation potential. However, there are noted challenges within the PPP framework, which may thwart the development of a robust PPP models for the water/waste sector. Some of these challenges have been listed below and will be discussed during the course of the workshop for developing attractive risk return frameworks for potential investors and lenders for financing the Ganga River restoration plan.

• PPP models, although allow greater private sector participation, need a robust regulatory and market framework to allot risks are virtually non-existent and sustained support from grantor/ government is warranted.
• Challenging take-out financing/appetite for waste treatments/effluent projects in India.
• Mechanisms to cover the payment risks are virtually non-existent and sustained support from grantor/ government is warranted.opportunity for insurance companies/pension funds can be explored for stable cash flow generating projects.
• Lack of long-term concessionary finance stifles investment by private equity groups
• Poor secondary markets are another reason why the throughput of infrastructure assets is weak.
• Foreign exchange fluctuations deter international lenders from providing longer tenor financing which is easily available through global capital markets.

The workshop is structured so as to address two critical areas:
• Economic and Regulatory Conditions needed to make PPPs work
• Financial instruments that can accelerate asset

Dr. Vinod Tare, Professor, IIT Kanpur

Dr Vinod Tare is a Professor of Environmental Engineering and Management at the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur and holds Sir M Visvesveriah Chair Professor instituted by the Ministry of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation. He is a Civil Engineer, obtained his Master’s and Doctoral degrees in Environmental Engineering from IIT Kanpur, and subsequently did post doctoral research at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. Dr Tare has guided numerous masters’ and doctoral dissertations. He was the Chairman of the India Water Impact Summit 2013 held at the India Habitat Centre, New Delhi and International Conference on Water – Harvesting, Storage and Conservation (WHSC- 2009). Dr Tare is consultant/advisor to many government organizations, NGOs, Industries, and Institutions. He has developed environment-friendly passenger coach toilet system being deployed for Indian Railways, communities, house boats, Kumbh Mela, etc. Dr Tare is presently leading consortia of seven IITs for the preparation of Ganga River Basin Management Plan which has been submitted to the National Ganga River Basin Authority chaired by the Prime Minister.

Sanmit Ahuja, Vice-Chairman, Oval Observer Foundation

Sanmit Ahuja is the Vice Chairman of Oval Observer Foundation. His core expertise lies in Development Economics; Private Equity; Project Finance; PPP models and establishing innovation eco-systems. He is also spearheading the development of a major Institute of Excellence focused on Sustainability that will promote multi- disciplinary thinking bringing together Economics, Engineering and Finance as a new paradigm of delivering impact and innovation. He started his career in the early 90s in New York within the Insurance sector followed by a short stint in the media sector in England from 2000 onwards before moving onto the Development finance and Infrastructure development arena. He is largely based out of UK and India offices of the organisation. He has an Engineering degree from University of Pune, India and an MBA degree from London Business School.
He is a hands-on practitioner of infrastructure development and has numerous Directorships including:
• ETI Dynamics, a sustainability focused infrastructure development and innovation firm
• Zeus Enviro, an asset management and corporate finance boutique specializing in renewable energy and environment sectors.

• 1330 hrs: Registrations
• 1400 hrs: Welcome Address IIT-Kanpur, Oval Observer Foundation
• 1410 hrs: The Economic framework needed to rejuvenate and restore Ganga Vinod Tare, IIT-Kanpur Coordinator, Consortium of 7 IITs on Ganga River Basin Management Plan
• 1440 hrs: Open Q&A Moderated by Sanmit Ahuja, Vice Chairman, Oval Observer Foundation and a member of IITC+
• 1540 hrs: Refreshments break
• 1600 hrs: Financial Instruments that can accelerate the financing of GRBMP Sanmit Ahuja, Vice Chairman, Oval Observer Foundation
• 1630: hrs Open Q&A
• 1700: hrs Release of Urban River Basin Management Plan Projects – Vinod Tare, IIT Kanpur – Sanmit Ahuja, Oval Observer Foundation
• 1710 hrs: Close

Oval Dialogue on Big Data and Good Governance

11th Feb 2015

The Oval Observer Foundation recently conducted a Dialogue on quantification of governance in India on the 4th of February, which touched upon the need to improve data collection and big data analytics to enhance public service delivery in India. The importance and benefits of big data analysis are widely acknowledged – transparency and accountability, participatory governance, faster decision making, predictive analysis, efficient delivery of services, better targeting of social programs, increased productivity and reduced administrative costs. Whether it is by eliminating leakages in welfare programs, improving policing by tracking crime patterns, detecting fraud in financial transactions or just holding government to account by identifying policy gaps, data analytics has revolutionary potential. As a result, in recent years, there has been a significant push for open and public access to data all over the world, including in India.

Oval Dialogue on Measuring Governance in India

30th Jan 2015

Public and political discourse in India today is dominated by talk of good governance. But while it is possible to meaningfully and objectively evaluate a claim of Kerala being better developed than Bihar; on what grounds can one evaluate the claim that governance in Gujarat is objectively better than governance in Maharashtra?

Oval Dialogue on Trade Finance in Emerging Markets

30th Jan 2015

The world economy and trade has been grappling with the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. It is only recently that there has been a modest trade growth of 4.7%. Nevertheless this growth remains below the 20-year average 5.3% and is a result of diminished import demand in developed economies coupled with moderate import growth in developing economies.

Africa International Banking and Finance Summit

11th Dec 2014

The inaugural edition of the Africa International Banking and Finance Summit will take place in London in June 2015. The primary focus of the Summit is on the role of the African banking sector in International Finance. With the African economies being the final frontier in terms of integration with global finance and trade, the international banking industry faces many challenges in bringing Africa into the fold as well, as finding channels for African industries to optimize economies.

WP-Backgrounds by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann
  • Women Clothing Online
  • Online Shopping for Women in India
  • Ethnic Wear Collection